Video Killed the Radio Star… Will Netflix Kill the Cinema Star?

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It was 1980 and The Buggles burst into a verse of “Video killed the radio star”. It sounded like a warning, a premonition and a war cry all in one. Just one year later MTV launched and it would go onto become a phenomenon and video did indeed kill the radio star… Of course radio was still around and still relevant for that matter, it was just no longer necessary for an artist or band to “make it”. They had other outputs, other ways. The “look” and appearance of a band had never been more important. Flamboyancy took over. Whilst commercial radio continues to exist to this day, I would think a band or artist are more likely to be discovered on a podcast, or a Spotify playlist as far as audible measures are concerned. Of course the music video is possibly more important than ever with the runaway, commercial success of YouTube.

When I saw that the original Netflix film ‘Rome’ had been Oscar nominated it made me ask if the age of cinema is coming to an end. Perhaps with escalating prices, Hollywood embarrassments and scandals along with streaming service providers offering genuine content, it can now be said that streaming is going to kill the movie star. You have to believe people in Hollywood can see it themselves. There has recently been a host of what would be considered Hollywood golden A stars signing up to do movies and tv series on streaming services. What if this is their curve point? They tried 3D to make the cinema experience more interactive but in reality, it only had limited success – if you need glasses to watch a movie – try putting your specs, over your specs. Or maybe you could pay thirty bucks for you and your partner to sit in a room next to the annoying person who needs a toilet break every three minutes in between eating his nachos, checking his phone and talking to his partner… It’s not going to be an easy task for them is it? Can the Hollywood elite turn it around, when the tide seems to be ever changing against them?

£10 a month for Netflix is great value for money and the content is constantly updating and changing. It is actually their original content that has always been invaluable to gaining me as a customer (or consumer). In the last decade or so, I can’t help but think the movie industry has had ample chances to turn it around, but have largely failed every time. Similar plots, the same old tired actors been cast as the same old, tired characters. Sequel after sequel after sequel with little or no emphasis placed on either young film makers or female writers/directors?

Surely it stands to reason that the next and future generations of filmmakers don’t have a cinema release within their dreams, but a Netlfix release?

 

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